Do you really need Sunglasses after Cataract Surgery?

  Yes!! After cataract eye surgery, protecting your eyes from harmful UV rays is more important than ever as your retina may be less able to protect you from those rays. 1 Prevent- A number of scientific studies indicate that spending long hours in the sun without eye protection can damage your eyes by contributing to cataracts and growths in the eye, including cancer. Based on these studies, ophthalmologists  recommend wearing  99 percent and higher UV (ultraviolet radiation)-absorbent sunglasses and a brimmed hat outdoors.   Protect- Proper sunglasses are key to protecting your eyes from sun-related damage and should always be worn outdoors particularly by individuals who have just had cataract surgery, LASIK or photodynamic therapy for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). More than two million Americans have cataract surgery each year. During this procedure, the eye’s lens is removed and … Read More

Can LOW VISION be helped with Amber Tinted Sunglasses?/ Can You Improve Low Vision?

Low vision is described as having partial vision, such as blurred vision, blind spots or tunnel vision and even blindness. Low vision makes daily life difficult and can interfere with reading, writing, shopping, watching television, driving a car or recognizing faces and cannot be corrected through surgery, medication, glasses or contact lenses. Low vision can manifest in many forms: Macular degeneration (AMD) and Diabetic retinopathy can affect central vision. Glaucoma and strokes affect peripheral vision. Most eye problems can affect contrast sensitivity. Poor depth perception can cause us to misjudge the height of a step for instance. Visual processing – Difficulties with visual processing affect how visual information is interpreted, or processed by the brain. Approximately 1 in 28 Americans over age 40 suffer from low vision. Aging is the number one factor linked to increased risk of developing low … Read More

Is Smoking Making you Blind?

Is it possible smokers delay quitting because the damage to their arteries, lungs and heart is not readily visible? Perhaps seeing (or more accurately, not seeing) the detrimental effects of smoking would make more people quit smoking sooner. If you need visible (or rather not visible…as in blinding) proof smoking has appalling effects on your health, you don’t need to go further than your eyes. As with the rest of your body, smoking has an appalling effect on your vision. If you smoke and need a few more reasons still to quit smoking, here are 5 reasons: Smokers have double the chances of getting cataracts, a clouding of the eye’s lens, and have triple the chances of developing macular degeneration, a blind spot in the center of our vision. The more you smoke, the greater your chances of forming cataracts … Read More

10 Things You Can Do Today That Your Future Self Will Thank You For

We’ve all heard it –Live in the present. There is a great deal of focus these days on living in the moment and living for today.  And while that might be a wonderful piece of wisdom, you can actually do something today that will also benefit you in the future. Whether it be acquiring skills to qualify for a better job, saving money for a rainy day or retirement or quitting smoking, having an eye on the future is not a bad thing. Whether you are 20 or 60 or 80, there is always something you can do today that will benefit you in the future. Exercise for 30 minutes a day (at least). You don’t have 30 minutes? How about three 10-minute chunks? We all have 10 minutes here and there. Go for a walk, jump rope, swim, garden, … Read More

Low Vision Aids – Low Vision Products -Solar Shield -Amber Fits over Sunglasses help Improve Low Vision

Low vision is described as having partial vision, such as blurred vision, blind spots or tunnel vision and even blindness. Low vision makes daily life difficult and can interfere with reading, writing, shopping, watching television, driving a car or recognizing faces and cannot be corrected through surgery, medication, glasses or contact lenses. Low vision can manifest in many forms: Central vision allows us to look directly at something and distinguish sharp detail.  Macular degeneration (AMD) and Diabetic retinopathy can affect central vision. Peripheral vision enables us to see everything surrounding the focal point. Glaucoma and strokes affect peripheral vision. Contrast sensitivity is the ability to distinguish between objects of similar tones such as facial features. Most eye problems can affect contrast sensitivity. Depth perception permits us to judge the position of objects in relation to one another. Poor depth perception … Read More

Polarization. Polarized Lenses.  What does that mean?

By now must of us know we should buy polarized sunglasses but most of us don’t know what polarization really is or does. Polarizing the lenses of sunglasses means a polarizing film has been laminated or cast onto the lenses. A polarized film is made up of special molecules running in horizontal parallel chains. This film acts as a filter, blocking out sun light that bounces off reflective surfaces such as car hoods, water, road surfaces, concrete, light colored or white surfaces, even fog. This reflected light, or glare, is 7 to 10 times brighter than normal daylight.  Polarization reduces glare. Glare is dangerous for several reasons: Glare is reflected UV light and ultraviolet sun rays have been linked to eye diseases like cataracts, macular degeneration, eye cancer, and other diseases. Glare is blinding and can result in accidents especially … Read More

What is the difference between an Ophthalmologist, an Optometrist and an Optician?

An ophthalmologist is a doctor who has completed college and has at least eight years of additional medical training. He is an M.D. with experience or specializes in eye problems and is trained to perform eye surgeries. An optometrist is trained to help improve patient’s vision by prescribing eyeglasses or contacts. They are also able to diagnose and treat some eye diseases. Optometrists are health care professionals who provide vision care such as sight testing and correction. An optometrist is not a medical doctor. An optometrist receives a doctor of optometry (O.D.) degree after completing four years of optometry school, preceded by three years or more years of college. They are licensed to perform eye exams and vision tests, prescribing and dispensing corrective lenses, detecting certain eye abnormalities, and prescribing medications for certain eye diseases. An optician is a specialized … Read More

Cataracts, Sensitivity to Light and Solar Shield ‘Fits Over’ Sunglasses

A cataract is a blurring of the lens in the eye making vision cloudy. Most cataracts are age-related. By age 80, more than 50% of all Americans will have a cataract. The lens is a clear part of the eye that allows light (images) through to the retina. The retina is the tissue in the back of the eye. In a healthy eye, light passes through the lens to the retina, reaches the retina, is changed into nerve signals and these are sent to the brain. The lens must be clear for the retina to receive a sharp image. If the lens is cloudy from a cataract, the image you see will be blurry. The eye lens is made of primarily of water and protein. The protein is arranged in a specific way that keeps the lens clear and lets … Read More

UV (Ultraviolet) Light and Eye-Health

Nearly 22 million Americans over 40 have cataracts. Over 2.3 million Americans over 40 are affected by glaucoma. More than 2 million Americans have macular degeneration. Long term exposure to UV rays – natural from the sun or artificial from tanning beds and other sources, causes damage to your eyes. The damage can range from snow blindness (Photokeratitis) to eye cancer. UV light exposure has a cumulative effect on the eyes. Damage to your eyes today, leads to eye-health problems tomorrow. UVA light can penetrate deeper into the eye and skin than UVA rays. UVA can affect your central vision and damage the macula (part of the retina in the back of the eye). Everyone is at risk of eye damage from UV light Look for sunglasses that are Polarized which means they block glare Wear sunglasses even on overcast … Read More